Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Pickups, wiring schemes, switch techniques and onboard active electronics for guitars

Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 19 Mar 2013, 09:23

blackbunny wrote:
DrNomis wrote: by DrNomis » Yesterday, 05:48
Here's a pic of the Headless Electric Guitar kit I bought as received:

Looks good so far DrNomis! Does it have a solid timber body, or is that some kind of plywood?
Also, is it from the Ebay store in Ireland as per your OP? And finally, did it cost much to freight it to Australia? :mrgreen:




Yep, the body is made of three pieces of solid wood glued together, I believe it's ash or maple, no plywood to be seen anywhere, as I said in my OP, I bought it from an eBay store in Ireland, freight to Australia was free, ie, didn't cost me a cent, all up the kit cost me about $250.00 Australian..... :thumbsup
Last edited by DrNomis on 19 Mar 2013, 09:35, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 19 Mar 2013, 09:30

askwho69 wrote:I'm planning to buy kit also... hows the quality of the kit? fret, tuning pegs, wood, as well as quality of wood work?



The kit quality seems to be pretty good for the money I paid for it, the routing for the volume/tone/pickup selector is a little rough, but I'm not too worried as it's covered up, all the pickup routing seems fine, as is the bridge routing, the neck pocket's a little lose, fretwork is really nice, the bridge also has the tuners on it (it's similar to the bridges found on Steinberger Headless guitars/basses), on the whole, I think it's pretty good quality for $250.00 Australian, I expected it to cost more.... :thumbsup
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 22 Mar 2013, 12:37

askwho69 wrote:
DrNomis wrote:
askwho69 wrote:I'm planning to buy kit also... hows the quality of the kit? fret, tuning pegs, wood, as well as quality of wood work?



The kit quality seems to be pretty good for the money I paid for it, the routing for the volume/tone/pickup selector is a little rough, but I'm not too worried as it's covered up, all the pickup routing seems fine, as is the bridge routing, the neck pocket's a little lose, fretwork is really nice, the bridge also has the tuners on it (it's similar to the bridges found on Steinberger Headless guitars/basses), on the whole, I think it's pretty good quality for $250.00 Australian, I expected it to cost more.... :thumbsup


Wow fret work is important for me :D thanks for explaining the details, it helps me convince to buy next time :D i think they accept some customized sizes too... like baritone, xjumbo frets, and more. need to save though :D

Thanks



No worries at all mate..... :thumbsup


Before you actually buy the kit, do a bit of googling/shopping around first to get a good idea of what's avalible, you might find what you're after at a bargain price, I'm not sure what sized frets are installed on the neck of my Headless guitar, but they look similar to the ones installed on the neck of my Mexican strat, the tops of the frets are really smooth, there's no portruding parts of the frets on the sides of the fingerboard, and the frets look like they've been finished pretty well considering the price of the kit, I honestly expected the fretwork to be so-so, but I was pleasantly surprised, the scale length is 25.5 inches, same like a Fender Strat, so I'm expecting the guitar to sound similar to a Fender Hot Rod strat with a bridge humbucker.... :thumbsup


When you get your kit, please keep us posted mate...... :thumbsup
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 22 Mar 2013, 14:28

askwho69 wrote:
DrNomis wrote:
askwho69 wrote:
DrNomis wrote:
askwho69 wrote:I'm planning to buy kit also... hows the quality of the kit? fret, tuning pegs, wood, as well as quality of wood work?



The kit quality seems to be pretty good for the money I paid for it, the routing for the volume/tone/pickup selector is a little rough, but I'm not too worried as it's covered up, all the pickup routing seems fine, as is the bridge routing, the neck pocket's a little lose, fretwork is really nice, the bridge also has the tuners on it (it's similar to the bridges found on Steinberger Headless guitars/basses), on the whole, I think it's pretty good quality for $250.00 Australian, I expected it to cost more.... :thumbsup


Wow fret work is important for me :D thanks for explaining the details, it helps me convince to buy next time :D i think they accept some customized sizes too... like baritone, xjumbo frets, and more. need to save though :D

Thanks




No worries at all mate..... :thumbsup


Before you actually buy the kit, do a bit of googling/shopping around first to get a good idea of what's avalible, you might find what you're after at a bargain price, I'm not sure what sized frets are installed on the neck of my Headless guitar, but they look similar to the ones installed on the neck of my Mexican strat, the tops of the frets are really smooth, there's no portruding parts of the frets on the sides of the fingerboard, and the frets look like they've been finished pretty well considering the price of the kit, I honestly expected the fretwork to be so-so, but I was pleasantly surprised, the scale length is 25.5 inches, same like a Fender Strat, so I'm expecting the guitar to sound similar to a Fender Hot Rod strat with a bridge humbucker.... :thumbsup


When you get your kit, please keep us posted mate...... :thumbsup


Please demo yours when you're done :D I will post mine if i can score, but i think i need more time to work hehehe :D



Will do, I might see if I can post a demo video clip along with some pics, I'm in the process of paying off a new Marshall guitar amp that I've got on layby, it's a Marshall MA100C 100 Watt all valve 2 X 12 inch combo amp, so I'll probably be using it when I do the demo video, bit excited about it as it's going to be the first time I own a Marshall amp..... :thumbsup
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 18 Apr 2013, 10:21

I just recently encountered a bit of a setback in the process of getting the Headless guitar up and running, I put the neck on the guitar,wired up all the electronics, and did a complete string/setup/tune-up of the guitar without doing all the painting and etc, this was to ensure everything worked without any major mods to the guitar, well.....firstly I noticed that the guitar was a real pain to keep in tune, even just touching the trem bar was enough to make the strings go sharp or flat, then when I was putting some new strings on it I heard a loud noise coming from the bridge as I adjusted the main spring-tension knob, turns out the thread s got stripped, so now I need to completely replace the bridge with a new one, trouble is a new one is going to cost me almost as much as the guitar kit did, so for the time being I'm going to shelve this project till another time..... :-|
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby MoonWatcher » 18 Apr 2013, 11:41

DrNomis wrote:I just recently encountered a bit of a setback in the process of getting the Headless guitar up and running, I put the neck on the guitar,wired up all the electronics, and did a complete string/setup/tune-up of the guitar without doing all the painting and etc, this was to ensure everything worked without any major mods to the guitar, well.....firstly I noticed that the guitar was a real pain to keep in tune, even just touching the trem bar was enough to make the strings go sharp or flat, then when I was putting some new strings on it I heard a loud noise coming from the bridge as I adjusted the main spring-tension knob, turns out the thread s got stripped, so now I need to completely replace the bridge with a new one, trouble is a new one is going to cost me almost as much as the guitar kit did, so for the time being I'm going to shelve this project till another time..... :-|

You couldn't find some local hardware or maybe do some tricks with a tap & die set?

Just thinking out loud. I've done lots of makeshift stuff over the years with bridge parts especially. Recall someone giving me a Kahler with lots of use on it - had binding rollers and all sorts of stuff.
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 18 Apr 2013, 12:14

MoonWatcher wrote:
DrNomis wrote:I just recently encountered a bit of a setback in the process of getting the Headless guitar up and running, I put the neck on the guitar,wired up all the electronics, and did a complete string/setup/tune-up of the guitar without doing all the painting and etc, this was to ensure everything worked without any major mods to the guitar, well.....firstly I noticed that the guitar was a real pain to keep in tune, even just touching the trem bar was enough to make the strings go sharp or flat, then when I was putting some new strings on it I heard a loud noise coming from the bridge as I adjusted the main spring-tension knob, turns out the thread s got stripped, so now I need to completely replace the bridge with a new one, trouble is a new one is going to cost me almost as much as the guitar kit did, so for the time being I'm going to shelve this project till another time..... :-|

You couldn't find some local hardware or maybe do some tricks with a tap & die set?

Just thinking out loud. I've done lots of makeshift stuff over the years with bridge parts especially. Recall someone giving me a Kahler with lots of use on it - had binding rollers and all sorts of stuff.



I suppose I could drill out the hole that the master spring-tension adjustment knob fits into and replace the original screw with one that's slightly larger in diameter, but as the bridge is basically a cheap Steinberger R-Trem knockoff, I'd probably end up with the thread stripping again, a new Overlord Of Music bridge is going to cost me at least $80.00 Au if I buy one on eBay, and a second-hand Steinberger R-Trem would cost me something like $200.00 if I bought one on eBay also too..... :hmmm:


Whoever did the routing on the body of the guitar could have been a bit more careful with regards to accuracy, the routing for the bridge humbucker is out of alignment by about 3mm from the centreline of the neck, and the routing for the bridge part with the pivot posts is a bit too wide and one of the mounting screw holes is way too close to the wall of the trench where the master-spring fits, I'll see if I can post a pic so you can see, to fix that I'll need to glue a 3mm strip of wood onto the side of the trench where the screw-hole is too close, I guess I shouldn't expect too much from a $250.00 guitar kit...... :thumbsup
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby rcustoms » 19 Apr 2013, 03:42

DrNomis wrote:
MoonWatcher wrote:
DrNomis wrote:I just recently encountered a bit of a setback in the process of getting the Headless guitar up and running, I put the neck on the guitar,wired up all the electronics, and did a complete string/setup/tune-up of the guitar without doing all the painting and etc, this was to ensure everything worked without any major mods to the guitar, well.....firstly I noticed that the guitar was a real pain to keep in tune, even just touching the trem bar was enough to make the strings go sharp or flat, then when I was putting some new strings on it I heard a loud noise coming from the bridge as I adjusted the main spring-tension knob, turns out the thread s got stripped, so now I need to completely replace the bridge with a new one, trouble is a new one is going to cost me almost as much as the guitar kit did, so for the time being I'm going to shelve this project till another time..... :-|

You couldn't find some local hardware or maybe do some tricks with a tap & die set?

Just thinking out loud. I've done lots of makeshift stuff over the years with bridge parts especially. Recall someone giving me a Kahler with lots of use on it - had binding rollers and all sorts of stuff.



I suppose I could drill out the hole that the master spring-tension adjustment knob fits into and replace the original screw with one that's slightly larger in diameter, but as the bridge is basically a cheap Steinberger R-Trem knockoff, I'd probably end up with the thread stripping again, a new Overlord Of Music bridge is going to cost me at least $80.00 Au if I buy one on eBay, and a second-hand Steinberger R-Trem would cost me something like $200.00 if I bought one on eBay also too..... :hmmm:


Whoever did the routing on the body of the guitar could have been a bit more careful with regards to accuracy, the routing for the bridge humbucker is out of alignment by about 3mm from the centreline of the neck, and the routing for the bridge part with the pivot posts is a bit too wide and one of the mounting screw holes is way too close to the wall of the trench where the master-spring fits, I'll see if I can post a pic so you can see, to fix that I'll need to glue a 3mm strip of wood onto the side of the trench where the screw-hole is too close, I guess I shouldn't expect too much from a $250.00 guitar kit...... :thumbsup


do not give up, who perseveres reaches.
show me pictures of the bridge and do some tricks without spending a lot money.and details with defects, pictures too ,i teach you some tricks to correct these defects
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 19 Apr 2013, 08:28

rcustoms wrote:
DrNomis wrote:
MoonWatcher wrote:
DrNomis wrote:I just recently encountered a bit of a setback in the process of getting the Headless guitar up and running, I put the neck on the guitar,wired up all the electronics, and did a complete string/setup/tune-up of the guitar without doing all the painting and etc, this was to ensure everything worked without any major mods to the guitar, well.....firstly I noticed that the guitar was a real pain to keep in tune, even just touching the trem bar was enough to make the strings go sharp or flat, then when I was putting some new strings on it I heard a loud noise coming from the bridge as I adjusted the main spring-tension knob, turns out the thread s got stripped, so now I need to completely replace the bridge with a new one, trouble is a new one is going to cost me almost as much as the guitar kit did, so for the time being I'm going to shelve this project till another time..... :-|

You couldn't find some local hardware or maybe do some tricks with a tap & die set?

Just thinking out loud. I've done lots of makeshift stuff over the years with bridge parts especially. Recall someone giving me a Kahler with lots of use on it - had binding rollers and all sorts of stuff.



I suppose I could drill out the hole that the master spring-tension adjustment knob fits into and replace the original screw with one that's slightly larger in diameter, but as the bridge is basically a cheap Steinberger R-Trem knockoff, I'd probably end up with the thread stripping again, a new Overlord Of Music bridge is going to cost me at least $80.00 Au if I buy one on eBay, and a second-hand Steinberger R-Trem would cost me something like $200.00 if I bought one on eBay also too..... :hmmm:


Whoever did the routing on the body of the guitar could have been a bit more careful with regards to accuracy, the routing for the bridge humbucker is out of alignment by about 3mm from the centreline of the neck, and the routing for the bridge part with the pivot posts is a bit too wide and one of the mounting screw holes is way too close to the wall of the trench where the master-spring fits, I'll see if I can post a pic so you can see, to fix that I'll need to glue a 3mm strip of wood onto the side of the trench where the screw-hole is too close, I guess I shouldn't expect too much from a $250.00 guitar kit...... :thumbsup


do not give up, who perseveres reaches.
show me pictures of the bridge and do some tricks without spending a lot money.and details with defects, pictures too ,i teach you some tricks to correct these defects



You're absolutely right, I'm not going to let the setback stop me from getting the guitar finished, I'll upload some pics as soon as I can find my digital camera so stay tuned, just want to say that I really appreciate all the help you guys are giving me with this project, cheers...... :thumbsup
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 19 Apr 2013, 09:13

I just had another look at the Overlord Of Music bridge that I got in the guitar kit, there's no way around it, I'm definitely going to have to totally replace it with a new one, not only are the threads on the master spring-tension adjustment parts stripped/worn the knife-edge pivot points are a bit worn too.... :thumbsup
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby MoonWatcher » 19 Apr 2013, 13:46

DrNomis wrote:I just had another look at the Overlord Of Music bridge that I got in the guitar kit, there's no way around it, I'm definitely going to have to totally replace it with a new one, not only are the threads on the master spring-tension adjustment parts stripped/worn the knife-edge pivot points are a bit worn too.... :thumbsup

That's a shame.

Keep us appraised as to what you find to replace it. I'm assuming it's a copy of the Steinberger Transtrem? I always wanted one of those but never had the money for it. I didn't realize there were copies of it. But in light of what you've said, I suppose the more proper statement would be durable/functional copies.

I've put off getting something like the Steinberger baritone model with the sliding capo thing for some time because of this. Not saying I could build the equivalent, but it at least has me thinking about the possibilities. I like some Allan Holdsworth stuff, and seem to be more in touch with using a bari as opposed to something with 7 or 8 strings.

I saw Bill Kirchen a few years back, and he did some numbers with a bari Telecaster - it would potentially be fun to build a kit thing with a twist on the Steinberger bridge and the Tele pickup configuration, too. Love that clean tone with some reverb and a touch of trem.
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 19 Apr 2013, 14:19

MoonWatcher wrote:
DrNomis wrote:I just had another look at the Overlord Of Music bridge that I got in the guitar kit, there's no way around it, I'm definitely going to have to totally replace it with a new one, not only are the threads on the master spring-tension adjustment parts stripped/worn the knife-edge pivot points are a bit worn too.... :thumbsup

That's a shame.

Keep us appraised as to what you find to replace it. I'm assuming it's a copy of the Steinberger Transtrem? I always wanted one of those but never had the money for it. I didn't realize there were copies of it. But in light of what you've said, I suppose the more proper statement would be durable/functional copies.

I've put off getting something like the Steinberger baritone model with the sliding capo thing for some time because of this. Not saying I could build the equivalent, but it at least has me thinking about the possibilities. I like some Allan Holdsworth stuff, and seem to be more in touch with using a bari as opposed to something with 7 or 8 strings.

I saw Bill Kirchen a few years back, and he did some numbers with a bari Telecaster - it would potentially be fun to build a kit thing with a twist on the Steinberger bridge and the Tele pickup configuration, too. Love that clean tone with some reverb and a touch of trem.



Actualy, from what I've read on some webpages, the Overlord Of Music Headless Guitar Bridge is basically a cheap knockoff of the Steinberger R-Trem bridge, both will fit in the routing, I've always wanted to get into Steinberger guitars too, but could never afford them, that's why I chose this kit, to be honest, I was expecting it to be really easy to keep in tune, but I was a bit disappointed, when I first put strings on the guitar so I could check to see if everything worked right before I went and did any finishing work on it, at least one string broke as I was tightening-up the grub screw that anchors the string, so I had to get a couple of complete sets of strings before I could continue, one day when tuning the guitar up, the wrapping at the ball-end of the high-E string came undone and the string went totally flat, I wasn't very impressed at all to be honest, I might look at buying a Steinberger Spirit on eBay one day when I can afford one...... :thumbsup

Those Steinberger Baritone guitars sound cool, and I've seen some 7 and 8 string Steinbergers online somewhere too..... :thumbsup
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby MoonWatcher » 19 Apr 2013, 19:16

This all gets me to thinking that while two things I don't really like to do any more than necessary are:

- fretwork

- reverse engineering bridge designs

But I think I'm half tempted to dig into the second one more. I've done basic stuff like redrilling and grinding/machining for different saddles, but I'll typically stop there.

I got one of those Babicz bridges (hardtail), and I like that one a lot. Probably not for everyone, but it does seem to address some issues that other bridges suffer from. I think he sells just saddles too?

It seems like along with DIY for pedals that there could be substantial money savings by being able to make some decent bridges or assemblies. I guess the hard part would be recognizing which existing readily available host pieces would make for a good foundation.

I wish that Washburn top-mount trem that was a flop years ago would have actually worked out.

I will admit that I have a speedloader style Floyd on one guitar that I like more than I thought I would. But for guys who insist on a beefy sustain block, they aren't going to go for that one...
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 20 Apr 2013, 06:02

MoonWatcher wrote:This all gets me to thinking that while two things I don't really like to do any more than necessary are:

- fretwork

- reverse engineering bridge designs

But I think I'm half tempted to dig into the second one more. I've done basic stuff like redrilling and grinding/machining for different saddles, but I'll typically stop there.

I got one of those Babicz bridges (hardtail), and I like that one a lot. Probably not for everyone, but it does seem to address some issues that other bridges suffer from. I think he sells just saddles too?

It seems like along with DIY for pedals that there could be substantial money savings by being able to make some decent bridges or assemblies. I guess the hard part would be recognizing which existing readily available host pieces would make for a good foundation.

I wish that Washburn top-mount trem that was a flop years ago would have actually worked out.

I will admit that I have a speedloader style Floyd on one guitar that I like more than I thought I would. But for guys who insist on a beefy sustain block, they aren't going to go for that one...



If I could get a hardtail version of the Overlord Of Music Headless Guitar bridge, that might stabilize the tuning a bit, I was thinking that if I could somehow figure out how to fit rollers to each of the string saddles on the bridge, that might improve things, I recently bought myself a new Dremel grinding tool from my local Jaycar Electronics Store, should come in handy as it came with a long flexible shaft and lots of attachments..... :thumbsup


At the moment I'm in the process of buying some new music equipment (see the Marshall MA 100C thread in the amplifiers section), so I'll have to wait till that's all over and done with before I continue on with this guitar project, note that it doesn't mean I've given up, just putting it on hold for a while, the weather we're getting here in Darwin hasn't dried up anyway..... :thumbsup
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby Steven_M » 22 Apr 2013, 18:39

If the bridge is stripped out, shouldn't the company you bought this from send you a replacement? Unless it was operator error, it sounds like a manufacturing defect to me.
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby MoonWatcher » 23 Apr 2013, 18:09

Steven_M wrote:If the bridge is stripped out, shouldn't the company you bought this from send you a replacement? Unless it was operator error, it sounds like a manufacturing defect to me.

I think the bigger issue is that the replacement is bound to fail like the one he now has, because the quality just isn't there.
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby Steven_M » 24 Apr 2013, 18:46

MoonWatcher wrote:
Steven_M wrote:If the bridge is stripped out, shouldn't the company you bought this from send you a replacement? Unless it was operator error, it sounds like a manufacturing defect to me.

I think the bigger issue is that the replacement is bound to fail like the one he now has, because the quality just isn't there.


That's not necessarily true. Even good companies can release a defective product. What's the harm in leaning on the seller? The worst they can say is, no.
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby MoonWatcher » 25 Apr 2013, 14:07

Steven_M wrote:
MoonWatcher wrote:
Steven_M wrote:If the bridge is stripped out, shouldn't the company you bought this from send you a replacement? Unless it was operator error, it sounds like a manufacturing defect to me.

I think the bigger issue is that the replacement is bound to fail like the one he now has, because the quality just isn't there.


That's not necessarily true. Even good companies can release a defective product. What's the harm in leaning on the seller? The worst they can say is, no.

True. I think Simon seemed to indicate that this knockoff doesn't seem to hold a candle to the build quality of the actual Steinberger unit, though. Or maybe just a more robust bridge in general. After you've twiddled around with enough of them, you can start to recognize where corners are cut - poorly cast or milled parts, potmetal substitutions, crude drilling and tapping...

...And perhaps the worst is off-spec assemblies - saddles too wide or narrow, spacing between studs is not quite right, and so on. After all, the factory where the body is milled versus the one where the hardware is made can typically be different. Look at all the aftermarket econo Tuneomatic bridges - there can be variances of over 3mm one way or the other. It's always a gamble trying to drop one on an existing guitar with the existing stud spacing. Granted, it can be exacerbated by Asian factories trying to make a judgement call as to whether to go with the Nashville or ABR-1 stud spacing, despite using the bigger modern sized studs and usually eliminating the retaining wire for either application. But they also transpose over from SAE to metric and have to make a judgement call anyway. I think Stewart Macdonald is a rare instance of a source that will give you spec's down to 1/32 or 1/64 of an inch, and the metric equivalent of that.

Maybe the best solution would be to try and grab a replacement from the seller if they offer, and try to bolster it where needed before anything might strip a second time. Not sure if you can get something like JB Weld around the world, but there's got to be something similar. Permatex has those kneadable epoxy sticks. There's obviously other machinist's repair solutions as well. It becomes a law of diminishing returns if there's a lot of issues, obviously. I think Simon mentioned that the contact points looked worn straight away out of the box? Unless they just threw in a heavily used unit, that means usually that no real hardening process was done at the factory. Even the cheaper Floyds will wear like that after a little bit of time.

Just things to keep in mind is all.
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby Lucifer » 12 Jul 2013, 17:22

Hi Doc,
Any updates on your 'headless' project yet ? Did you manage to get your bridge sorted ?

I'm just building a 'Tele' for myself from bits purchased on YeBa. Not a kit, as such, but an interesting little project nevertheless.

Got a nice 50s-style maple neck complete with tuners, frets, nut - very cheap - cos the nut's been set a bit skewed (easy enough to reset).
The body's a spraying reject, but that's no prob, as I'm going to rub it down anyway and do a bit of re-shaping (Strat-type contours).

Building and wiring should be dead easy, but the bit that I'm not confident about is re-finishing the body. You seem pretty clued up on that . . . so any tips ?

Cheers,
Lucifer
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Re: Building Electric Guitars From Kits.

Postby DrNomis » 12 Jul 2013, 18:21

Lucifer wrote:Hi Doc,
Any updates on your 'headless' project yet ? Did you manage to get your bridge sorted ?

I'm just building a 'Tele' for myself from bits purchased on YeBa. Not a kit, as such, but an interesting little project nevertheless.

Got a nice 50s-style maple neck complete with tuners, frets, nut - very cheap - cos the nut's been set a bit skewed (easy enough to reset).
The body's a spraying reject, but that's no prob, as I'm going to rub it down anyway and do a bit of re-shaping (Strat-type contours).

Building and wiring should be dead easy, but the bit that I'm not confident about is re-finishing the body. You seem pretty clued up on that . . . so any tips ?

Cheers,
Lucifer



Hi Lucifer,

I was hoping I could buy an R-Trem bridge on eBay at a good price to replace the Overlord Of Music bridge that was supplied in the kit, unfortunately there weren't many R-Trems listed, so I did some netsurfing and found an online company that sells complete R-Trems, but they want $234.00 for one, I might just have to bite the bullet and buy one when my finances permit me to, so for the time being all I can do is take the guitar apart and apply sealer to the body and neck, looks like this project is going to take longer than I anticipated, I'll keep the updates coming though.... :thumbsup


Your Tele project sounds cool, I'm a bit new to guitar body finishing so I understand, it's a bit of a learning curve.... :thumbsup


From what I've read, after you've done all the sanding-down of the finish the first thing that needs to be done is to coat the body and the back of the neck with a good wood sanding-sealer, I went to my local Bunnings store and ended up buying a can of Feast Watson Sanding Sealer, my younger brother suggested testing it out using some pieces of wood from a couple of clothes pegs just to see how long it took to dry (we were still in our wet season at the time hence the reason for testing it), once you've got about 4 layers or so built up, you sand the surface smooth, the PDF books I got from rcustoms said to start with something like 320 grit and work your way up to something like 600 grit sandpaper, once you've sanded it smooth you then work out what kind of finish you want, I did a lot of thinking and decided to clear-lacquer the back of the neck and paint the body metallic blue, but really the finish of your guitar is totally up to you, you could pm rcustoms and ask him to email you the pdf books he emailed me, have a good read of them cause they're great books.... :thumbsup

I might see if I can post the pdfs in this thread next fortnight as my internet credit's getting a bit low.... :thumbsup


One tip is to take your time with the finishing as you'll be sure to end up with a good result.... :thumbsup


Here's a link to the website:

http://www.edroman.com/guitars/steinberger/parts.htm
Genius is not all about 99% perspiration, and 1% inspiration - sometimes the solution is staring you right in the face.-Frequencycentral.

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Lucifer (12 Jul 2013, 23:14)
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