How do you transfer a schematic to bread board?

Ok, you got your soldering iron and nothing is going to hold you back, but you have no clue where to start or what to build. There were others before you with the same questions... read them first.

How do you transfer a schematic to bread board?

Postby PedalPlayer » 07 May 2009, 12:05

I'm kind of new at this and I was wondering, how to you guys look at the schematic and then come up with the layout? I've always had trouble following the schematic, and I can't see how you would be able to transfer the two. Any help would be great. Thanks.
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Re: How To You Transfer a Circuit To a Breadboard?

Postby IvIark » 07 May 2009, 12:31

Beavis Audio have a great guide From Schematic to Reality, check it out.
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Re: How To You Transfer a Circuit To a Breadboard?

Postby Scruffie » 07 May 2009, 12:31

Here ya go, everything you should need to know,

http://www.beavisaudio.com/techpages/Sc ... ToReality/

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Re: How To You Transfer a Circuit To a Breadboard?

Postby PedalPlayer » 07 May 2009, 21:18

Wow, that's really helpful. The only thing I don't understand is what is the deal with the jumpering? Why are some of the spots on the breadboard jumpered?
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How to make a breadboard layout?

Postby PedalPlayer » 09 May 2009, 01:31

Thanks for the schematic Madbean, it looks great. What do you have the two switches doing? I also think its cool how you put the trimmer for the treble on the top. Also, does any one have a breadboard layout for this by any chance?
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Re: Analogman - King of Tone

Postby JimiB » 09 May 2009, 04:14

Also, does any one have a breadboard layout for this by any chance?

Seriously?
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Re: Analogman - King of Tone

Postby Greg » 09 May 2009, 04:24

PedalPlayer wrote:Thanks for the schematic Madbean, it looks great. What do you have the two switches doing? I also think its cool how you put the trimmer for the treble on the top. Also, does any one have a breadboard layout for this by any chance?


Breadboarding is generally an 'ad lib' sort of thing.. no-one is going to have or post a Breadboard Layout I don't think.. you would generally put it together stright from the schematic, then mess with it to try different things.
When done it all comes off the board for the next project.

If you have no experience with breadboarding and want to learn how to do it, you might want to consider something like one these:

http://www.indy-guitarist.com/inc/sdetail/100
http://www.beavisaudio.com/bboard/

:thumbsup Have fun.
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Re: Analogman - King of Tone

Postby PedalPlayer » 09 May 2009, 12:42

Ok, thanks. Like I said, I'm really new at this stuff and I don't have a ton of experience with how it works. I didn't realize that was a stupid question :slap: Thanks for posting those links.
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Re: Analogman - King of Tone

Postby Greg » 09 May 2009, 12:49

No problem Pedalplayer.. I can see you're keen and that's great.
Ask away.. the board from Beavis would be a great learning tool I think, as well as something you'll continue to use.
You can also build something similar if you can't afford it or want to change something... Beavis has kindly included everything you need to duplicate it.
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Re: Analogman - King of Tone

Postby PedalPlayer » 09 May 2009, 12:56

Yeah, I saw a link from the beavis site posted on here that explained how to convert a schematic to a breadboard and it really helped my understanding of it. There's still a bit more I need to learn about it, but it really helped my understanding.
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Re: How To You Transfer a Circuit To a Breadboard?

Postby cpnyc23 » 09 May 2009, 18:01

Because of the way breadboards are laid out, you only have so many continuous rows. You need to run a jumper to connect the different strips to other parts of the board. Think of jumpers as traces on a circuit board - they are just conduits for electrons to flow to normally unconnected pathways.

-chris
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Re: How To You Transfer a Circuit To a Breadboard?

Postby cpnyc23 » 09 May 2009, 18:01

Because of the way breadboards are laid out, you only have so many continuous rows. You need to run a jumper to connect the different strips to other parts of the board. Think of jumpers as traces on a circuit board - they are just conduits for electrons to flow to normally unconnected pathways.

-chris
"I've traveled the world and never seen a statue of a critic." -L.B.
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Re: How To You Transfer a Circuit To a Breadboard?

Postby PedalPlayer » 10 May 2009, 17:34

Thanks for the response about the jumpers. That makes sense and that was what I thought they were for, I just wasn't sure.
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Re: How To You Transfer a Circuit To a Breadboard?

Postby sgtdrpepper » 19 May 2009, 02:09

Thanks for the links i just decided to give effects building a try and there is a wealth of information in these forums.
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Re: How do you transfer a schematic to bread board?

Postby bigmufffuzzwizz » 27 Mar 2011, 18:50

I guess going to school really is starting to pay off!
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Re: Analogman - King of Tone

Postby DrNomis » 27 Mar 2011, 18:58

PedalPlayer wrote:Ok, thanks. Like I said, I'm really new at this stuff and I don't have a ton of experience with how it works. I didn't realize that was a stupid question :slap: Thanks for posting those links.




Personally, I think there's no such thing as a "stupid question", all questions are valid in my book, that's how human beings learn about things..... :D
Genius is not all about 99% perspiration, and 1% inspiration - sometimes the solution is staring you right in the face.-Frequencycentral.
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Re: Analogman - King of Tone

Postby bigmufffuzzwizz » 27 Mar 2011, 19:06

DrNomis wrote:
PedalPlayer wrote:Ok, thanks. Like I said, I'm really new at this stuff and I don't have a ton of experience with how it works. I didn't realize that was a stupid question :slap: Thanks for posting those links.




Personally, I think there's no such thing as a "stupid question", all questions are valid in my book, that's how human beings learn about things..... :D


The man is correct! Accepting your newbie-ism is the first step to moving forward. :lol:
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Re: How do you transfer a schematic to bread board?

Postby geiristudio » 05 Jun 2011, 17:06

Thanks for the link. I've been reading a lot and collecting information on pedals I would like to give a try building. I have the confidence to start building various pedals but lack the knowledge so this helped me very much! I'm a very fast learner because I give it all to the projects I work on, being playing guitar, recording music or something else. I always give 110% and try to learn as much as I can about the objective.

I really like the idea of veroboards and using them. I find that I should be able to learn how to read schematics quickly by using hero and reading through until I get it right. I'll start with the super simple pedal in the link and work my way forward.

Thanks again!
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Re: How do you transfer a schematic to bread board?

Postby JayArLee » 04 Sep 2012, 11:28

Hi everyone. Wow, how I wish this thread would be updated. links are dead. :(
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Re: How do you transfer a schematic to bread board?

Postby fishfude » 18 Nov 2013, 00:03

Breadboarding can be a little tricky at the start, but once you understand the principles of how the connections are made under the surface, it gets a bit easier. This is an image I did up in photoshop to help me remember/better understand the connections on a breadboard:

Image

Notice that the top two rows are connected horizontally. Anything plugged into one of the holes in one of these rows will be connected to anything else plugged into one of the holes in the same row. Note that the two top rows are not connected.

Now notice how the vertical rows are connected in a similar way, but there is a break in the middle of the breadboard.

The bottom half of the breadboard works just the same as the top half.

This is a picture of what the same size breadboard physically looks like: Image

The gap in the middles is for placing Integrated Circuits (ICs) onto the breadboard without their legs being connected (each leg has it's own purpose) -

Image


If you want to connect different components together, you simply plug them into the same row on the breadboard. If you run out of space in a particular row, you can use a jumper wire to connect to another row. It will be electrically identical to the row it just came from, and can be seen as an extension of that row.

Here is an image of a breadboard with an integrated circuit (IC), components and jumper wires.

Image

Note that the top horizontal row is the +V (positive voltage terminal from the battery) and the very bottom row is -V (negative voltage terminal (known as ground) from the battery). Note that there are three black wires going to ground, joining the bottom row in three positions.
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