Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

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Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby POTL » 01 Jan 2018, 23:03

Hello
I again asked the bypass question on the relay, using a microcontroller.
I see several circuits that are similar, but the microcontrollers are different
Basically it's Attiny13 / Attiny85 / Pic12F675
I'm still far from digital technologies and I want to start studying these technologies, tell me about the difference between these microcontrollers in the operation of the bypass switch.
Will there be any difference in the work or for these purposes the microcontroller model does not play a significant role?
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Re: Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby kingmafw » 01 Jan 2018, 23:42

In my opinion the microcontroller is only the tool to get it done. Food for thought can be found here:

Microchip PIC:
http://www.coda-effects.com/2017/02/relay-bypass-final-code.html

ATtiny:
http://freestompboxes.org/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=24589&hilit=pruttelherrie
it is mei sizzen net to dwaen

Johannes Harald Kingma - FWS Pedals - Germany

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Re: Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby POTL » 02 Jan 2018, 02:02

Thanks, I read, I'm wondering if there is a difference in the performance of these microcontrollers, I'm interested in making 2 modes of operation:
1) Turning on and off
2) Switching on by holding the button and turning off by releasing the button
Can both of these types of microcontrollers work equally well?
Is there a difference?
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Re: Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby marshmellow » 02 Jan 2018, 12:36

Any controller can do that. It's just a matter of preference for the designer.

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Re: Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby J0K3RX » 02 Jan 2018, 16:03

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Re: Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby POTL » 03 Jan 2018, 04:10

marshmellow wrote:Any controller can do that. It's just a matter of preference for the designer.

thanks
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Re: Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby POTL » 03 Jan 2018, 04:12

J0K3RX wrote:or, you can try these..
https://guyatoneus.com/shop/3pdt-smooth ... ro-series/


thanks, but I do not see the point of paying $ 15 per switch, it's 10 times more expensive than the usual 3pdt in china
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Re: Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby POTL » 03 Jan 2018, 04:26

for this bypass, an anti-click resistor of 1 mega-ohm between the ground and the input is not needed
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Re: Relay Bypass With Microcontroller

Postby plush » 03 Jan 2018, 10:58

POTL wrote:for this bypass, an anti-click resistor of 1 mega-ohm between the ground and the input is not needed


1-10Mohm pull down resistor is used to drain signal caps and mitigate the potential differences once the pedal is turned on.

It has nothing to do with the relay/3pdt click noise which both do have.
I guess you should leave your pull down resistor in it's place.

To mitigate relay click noise (debouncing), 5-10ms of soft or hard muting (via optofet) is normally applied. Muting means that you cut your signal to ground for a period of time untill your relay contacts stop bouncing. Contact bouncing could be very noticeable in high gain circuits or delay/reverb lines. ...small signal relays are more prone to bouncing, since their contacts groups are thinner and more springy than your typical 3pdt's.

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